"ILION" SELF-DUMP SULKY RAKE

Manufactured by the
REMINGTON AGRICULTURAL CO.

Following are excerpts from "History of Herkimer County, N. Y.," F. W. Beers & Co., New York, 1879, pages 164-168, which were transcribed by Lisa Slaski in the Remington Family Showcase in the Village of Ilion website.

"The manufacture of agricultural implements was commenced in the armory in 1856. . . . . . The first article manufactured was a cultivator tooth. . . . . . About the time when the manufacture of these blades was commenced the practicability of steel plows began to be discussed. . . . . .In the following year a single plow was made. . . . . .Here are also manufactured mowing machines, reapers, wheel rakes, steel garden rakes, cultivators, patent horse hoes, shovel plows, field and garden hoes of every size and form, and, indeed, almost every kind of agricultural implement."

In this presentation there are copies of a pamphlet used by the Remingtons in 1873 advertising their SELF-DUMP SULKY RAKE. This may be what was mentioined as a Wheel Rake in the above excerpt. In addition to the pamphlet, there are also photos of a working model of the Sulky Rake that has been in my family as long as I can remember, somewhere back to the 1920's. It has a wooden case which appears to have been hand made, and, as a friend of mine suggested, may have been used by a salesman when approaching a prospective customer. The model was fabricated with the same precision that was the trademark of Remington products. My father had it, but never mentioned where he got it or when and where it was fabricated. The model still works without sticking; the wheels revolve and the forks, which were raised to dump the hay, can still be raised and lowered either by foot pedal or hand lever.

Paul T. McLaughlin
Village of Ilion Editor
May 2003


CLICK ON IMAGE BELOW FOR A LARGER (and clearer) VERSION


(Pamphlet)

Front Page

Back Page


(Model)




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Established: 1 Jun 2003
Copyright © 2003 Paul McLaughlin/ Lisa K. Slaski